Monthly Archives: January 2018

Book Review: Wisdom Walking

Wisdom Walking: Pilgrimage as a Way of Life by Gil Stafford is part philosophy of pilgrimage through the metaphor of alchemy and part compilation of stories of various pilgrimage journeys and those who walked them.

I was really looking forward to this book and for the most part was not disappointed. Stafford’s casual style is accessible and inviting, and it was a perfect book to read using my walking desk! While the writing was occasionally repetitive and dragged in some spots, it was overall encouraging, confirming, and inspiring to my pilgrim heart. I found myself nodding along, scribbling in the margins, and underlining along the way. I particularly appreciated the Jungian theory and wisdom of great spiritual mystics like Theresa of Avila sprinkled throughout the book. I came away with a reading list!

This book is a great read for anyone interested in pilgrimage, Jungian psychology, or generally struggling with a faith shift, significant loss, or other catalyst for spiritual and personal growth. I consider it a worthwhile addition to my bookshelf.

Link-Love:

Gil Stafford’s Website
Gil Stafford on Facebook
Walking Your Pilgrim Path | Gil Stafford – an excerpt on MikeMorrell.org

#WisdomWalking

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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Book Review: Mind Your Life

Mind Your Life: How Mindfulness Can Build Resilience and Reveal Your Extraordinary by Meg Salter is an accessible and useful handbook for anyone curious about, suspicious of, or looking for tools and guidance to support an integrated meditation practice.

Of note is Salter’s intention to make mindfulness meditation practices and techniques accessible without any particular religious or spiritual language or belief system overlaid. Instead, she focuses on the scientifically proven physical and mental effects (read: benefits) of meditation and sprinkles in a variety of  case study examples, which she terms “ordinary heroes,” along the way to exemplify the motivation for, experience of, and integration of habitual practice of meditation in the everyday life of people in a variety of life situations.

A good portion of the book is devoted to simple-yet-detailed step-by-step guides for trying a variety of methods of mindfulness, and she even includes a few workbook-like pages along the way to aid the reader in developing an individual practice tailored to their own intentions, goals, and lifestyle.

As a practitioner of Thomas Keating’s centering prayer method of meditation, I found this book to support and deepen my understanding of my practice. This book is definitely one for the bookshelf as I am certain to return to it again to lend practical advice and variety to support my personal prayer practice.

Link-Love:

Meg Salter’s Website
Meg Salter on Facebook
Meg Salter on Twitter

#MindYourLife

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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